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THE OLD SCOT - Hands Across the Sea Samplers
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The Old Scot - Reproduction Sampler by Hands Across the Sea Samplers

It has been a delight to reproduce this colourful and whimsical sampler which was stitched by Elizabeth Furniss in 1836 (during the reign of William IV) when she was 13 years of age.

There are several girls with this name born around 1823 and it is impossible to say with any certainty which Elizabeth is our stitcher. The surname of “Furnass” is of Old Norse-Viking origins, and is a locational name from Furness, a district on the south coast of what is now Cumberland.

The sampler is suitable for all levels of ability and is worked entirely in cross-stitch over 2 threads, only the text and two small lambs are over 1 thread.

Elizabeth’s well-known verse, stitched across three lines at the top of the sampler, straddles a central cartouche which bears her name and age.

Jesus permit thy gracious name to stand
As the first effort of a females hand
And has(sic) her fingers on the canvass (sic) move

Engage her tender heart to seek thy love
With thy dear children may she have a part
And write thy Name thyself upon her heart

This verse is attributed by some to John Newton (1725 – 1807), best known for the hymn “Amazing Grace”. It is said that he wrote it for the sampler of his niece. It has also been suggested that it was composed by Isaac Watts (1674 – 1748), also for his niece.

Verses found on English samplers between 1750 and 1850 tend to be either from the Bible, Isaac Watt’s religious poetry, or the Wesleyan hymnbook. Religious proverbs and sayings were also much favoured, and those which used a rhyme or a play on words.

- See more at: https://hands-across-the-sea-samplers.com/product/elizabeth-furniss-1836/#sthash.IiWcPYPz.dpuf

It has been a delight to reproduce this colourful and whimsical sampler which was stitched by Elizabeth Furniss in 1836 (during the reign of William IV) when she was 13 years of age.

There are several girls with this name born around 1823 and it is impossible to say with any certainty which Elizabeth is our stitcher. The surname of “Furnass” is of Old Norse-Viking origins, and is a locational name from Furness, a district on the south coast of what is now Cumberland.

The sampler is suitable for all levels of ability and is worked entirely in cross-stitch over 2 threads, only the text and two small lambs are over 1 thread.

Elizabeth’s well-known verse, stitched across three lines at the top of the sampler, straddles a central cartouche which bears her name and age.

Jesus permit thy gracious name to stand
As the first effort of a females hand
And has(sic) her fingers on the canvass (sic) move

Engage her tender heart to seek thy love
With thy dear children may she have a part
And write thy Name thyself upon her heart

This verse is attributed by some to John Newton (1725 – 1807), best known for the hymn “Amazing Grace”. It is said that he wrote it for the sampler of his niece. It has also been suggested that it was composed by Isaac Watts (1674 – 1748), also for his niece.

Verses found on English samplers between 1750 and 1850 tend to be either from the Bible, Isaac Watt’s religious poetry, or the Wesleyan hymnbook. Religious proverbs and sayings were also much favoured, and those which used a rhyme or a play on words.

- See more at: https://hands-across-the-sea-samplers.com/product/elizabeth-furniss-1836/#sthash.IiWcPYPz.dpuf

It has been a delight to reproduce this colourful and whimsical sampler which was stitched by Elizabeth Furniss in 1836 (during the reign of William IV) when she was 13 years of age.

There are several girls with this name born around 1823 and it is impossible to say with any certainty which Elizabeth is our stitcher. The surname of “Furnass” is of Old Norse-Viking origins, and is a locational name from Furness, a district on the south coast of what is now Cumberland.

The sampler is suitable for all levels of ability and is worked entirely in cross-stitch over 2 threads, only the text and two small lambs are over 1 thread.

- See more at: https://hands-across-the-sea-samplers.com/product/elizabeth-furniss-1836/#sthash.IiWcPYPz.dpuf


This listing is for the chart only, although we would be happy to put a project kit together for you.

The model has been reproduced with Au ver a soie d'Alger silk and the skein quantities calculated based on 1 strand on 36 count linen. The DMC conversion is based on two strands on 36 count linen.

The stitch count is 240 (w) x 271 (h)
Elizabeth’s sampler has been charted with AVAS with a DMC conversion provided. The model was stitched on 40ct Lakeside Linen Vintage Sand Dune. - See more at: https://hands-across-the-sea-samplers.com/product/elizabeth-furniss-1836/#sthash.IiWcPYPz.dpuf


The chart is 20 pages with stitching guide, detailed photographs and comprehensive instructions. 
There are a variety of stitches used: cross stitch over 1 and 2 threads, chain stitch, satin stitch, French knot, four sided stitch and Algerian eyelets. Sarah’s sampler has been rated as suitable for advanced stitchers, however, it is not beyond confident and determined intermediates. - See more at: https://hands-across-the-sea-samplers.com/product/sarah-borton-1815/#sthash.WKmHtv4x.dpuf

There are a variety of stitches used: cros stitch over 2 threads, back stitch, satin stitch, four sided stitch and two different forms of Rice stitch.

Suitable for the Intermediate stitcher, but not beyond a confident Beginner stitcher who is ready to take the next step with counted needlework.
The Old Scot - Reproduction Antique Sampler by Hands Across the Sea Samplers

It has been a delight to reproduce this colourful and whimsical sampler which was stitched by Elizabeth Furniss in 1836 (during the reign of William IV) when she was 13 years of age.

There are several girls with this name born around 1823 and it is impossible to say with any certainty which Elizabeth is our stitcher. The surname of “Furnass” is of Old Norse-Viking origins, and is a locational name from Furness, a district on the south coast of what is now Cumberland.

The sampler is suitable for all levels of ability and is worked entirely in cross-stitch over 2 threads, only the text and two small lambs are over 1 thread.

Elizabeth’s well-known verse, stitched across three lines at the top of the sampler, straddles a central cartouche which bears her name and age.

Jesus permit thy gracious name to stand
As the first effort of a females hand
And has(sic) her fingers on the canvass (sic) move

Engage her tender heart to seek thy love
With thy dear children may she have a part
And write thy Name thyself upon her heart

This verse is attributed by some to John Newton (1725 – 1807), best known for the hymn “Amazing Grace”. It is said that he wrote it for the sampler of his niece. It has also been suggested that it was composed by Isaac Watts (1674 – 1748), also for his niece.

Verses found on English samplers between 1750 and 1850 tend to be either from the Bible, Isaac Watt’s religious poetry, or the Wesleyan hymnbook. Religious proverbs and sayings were also much favoured, and those which used a rhyme or a play on words.

- See more at: https://hands-across-the-sea-samplers.com/product/elizabeth-furniss-1836/#sthash.IiWcPYPz.dpuf

It has been a delight to reproduce this colourful and whimsical sampler which was stitched by Elizabeth Furniss in 1836 (during the reign of William IV) when she was 13 years of age.

There are several girls with this name born around 1823 and it is impossible to say with any certainty which Elizabeth is our stitcher. The surname of “Furnass” is of Old Norse-Viking origins, and is a locational name from Furness, a district on the south coast of what is now Cumberland.

The sampler is suitable for all levels of ability and is worked entirely in cross-stitch over 2 threads, only the text and two small lambs are over 1 thread.

Elizabeth’s well-known verse, stitched across three lines at the top of the sampler, straddles a central cartouche which bears her name and age.

Jesus permit thy gracious name to stand
As the first effort of a females hand
And has(sic) her fingers on the canvass (sic) move

Engage her tender heart to seek thy love
With thy dear children may she have a part
And write thy Name thyself upon her heart

This verse is attributed by some to John Newton (1725 – 1807), best known for the hymn “Amazing Grace”. It is said that he wrote it for the sampler of his niece. It has also been suggested that it was composed by Isaac Watts (1674 – 1748), also for his niece.

Verses found on English samplers between 1750 and 1850 tend to be either from the Bible, Isaac Watt’s religious poetry, or the Wesleyan hymnbook. Religious proverbs and sayings were also much favoured, and those which used a rhyme or a play on words.

- See more at: https://hands-across-the-sea-samplers.com/product/elizabeth-furniss-1836/#sthash.IiWcPYPz.dpuf

It has been a delight to reproduce this colourful and whimsical sampler which was stitched by Elizabeth Furniss in 1836 (during the reign of William IV) when she was 13 years of age.

There are several girls with this name born around 1823 and it is impossible to say with any certainty which Elizabeth is our stitcher. The surname of “Furnass” is of Old Norse-Viking origins, and is a locational name from Furness, a district on the south coast of what is now Cumberland.

The sampler is suitable for all levels of ability and is worked entirely in cross-stitch over 2 threads, only the text and two small lambs are over 1 thread.

- See more at: https://hands-across-the-sea-samplers.com/product/elizabeth-furniss-1836/#sthash.IiWcPYPz.dpuf


This listing is for the chart only, although we would be happy to put a project kit together for you.

The model has been stitched in Au ver a soie d'alger silk threads but can also be worked in DMC stranded cottons.

The stitch count is 311 (w) x 461 (h)
Elizabeth’s sampler has been charted with AVAS with a DMC conversion provided. The model was stitched on 40ct Lakeside Linen Vintage Sand Dune. - See more at: https://hands-across-the-sea-samplers.com/product/elizabeth-furniss-1836/#sthash.IiWcPYPz.dpuf

Elizabeth’s sampler has been charted with AVAS with a DMC conversion provided. The model was stitched on 40ct Lakeside Linen Vintage Sand Dune. - See more at: https://hands-across-the-sea-samplers.com/product/elizabeth-furniss-1836/#sthash.IiWcPYPz.dpuf

Whilst the sampler was acquired by us in England it can be nothing other than a Scottish sampler from the mid 1700’s. This was a fascinating and turbulent time in Scottish history and will, forever, be linked with Bonnie Prince Charlie and the doomed Jacobite Cause.

A stylised thistle border surrounds this beautiful Scottish sampler that was stitched circa 1740-1760 on 36ct linen with fine wool. The un-named sampler features two reversed flower bands and two elaborate upper-case alphabets of solid cross stitched centres surrounded by back stitched curlicues.

Five sets of initials are recorded on the sampler but none feature the same last initial so it is possible that these may not be the initials of family members but of friends.  The three storey building with many windows, three pointed gables and a man with a staff in the doorway is of great interest to us.

- See more at: https://hands-across-the-sea-samplers.com/product/old-scot-circa-1740-60/#sthash.5cCPPWgC.dpuf

Whilst the sampler was acquired by us in England it can be nothing other than a Scottish sampler from the mid 1700’s. This was a fascinating and turbulent time in Scottish history and will, forever, be linked with Bonnie Prince Charlie and the doomed Jacobite Cause.

A stylised thistle border surrounds this beautiful Scottish sampler that was stitched circa 1740-1760 on 36ct linen with fine wool. The un-named sampler features two reversed flower bands and two elaborate upper-case alphabets of solid cross stitched centres surrounded by back stitched curlicues.

Five sets of initials are recorded on the sampler but none feature the same last initial so it is possible that these may not be the initials of family members but of friends.  The three storey building with many windows, three pointed gables and a man with a staff in the doorway is of great interest to us.

- See more at: https://hands-across-the-sea-samplers.com/product/old-scot-circa-1740-60/#sthash.5cCPPWgC.dpuf
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